The Winter Dragon (Ojutai primer, pt. 1)

Introduction:
Though the switch between the old Tarkir timeline to the new led to the destruction of my favourite world of all time in Magic – the Khans-timeline Tarkir, it brought with it my favourite Commander of all time: Dragonlord Ojutai. As head of his eponymous clan after the downfall of all khans and the death of Shu Yun at the hands (at the breath?) of Ojutai himself, Dragonlord Ojutai is also known as “the Great Teacher”. His clan values knowledge and wisdom, as well as martial prowess, and Ojutai is the epitome of both those aspects.

This deck started off as a reaction to my friend’s project to build Dragonlord Atarka, and originally it was intended to be a school-themed deck. I’ve written about the deck’s thematic construction before (part 1, part 2, part 3), and since the deck has gone through numerous changes since, I want to focus on the deck’s function.

Why Ojutai?
Azorius is blessed with several good candidates for the command zone, whether you’re into control (Grand Arbiter Augustin IV), voltron (Bruna, Light of Alabaster, Geist of Saint Traft), blink (Brago, King Eternal), or even tribal (Sygg, River Guide, Kangee, Aerie Keeper). Ojutai steps into the ponds of both Augustin IV and Bruna by being a voltron commander of a control shell. This dual nature of the deck lends it strengths not available to other commanders: he’s better protected than Augustin IV, he’s cheaper than Bruna, and he’s better at generating card advantage than Saint Traft. This combined strength along with the nice thematic flavour of the commander makes him my choice.

Do play this deck if you:

  • Like long games.
  • Like interactive play where you’re able to answer a variety of threats.
  • Like your commander to generate cards for you.
  • Like to win with commander damage.

Do not play this deck if you:

  • Like to ramp out into huge threats.
  • Like to win quickly out of nowhere.

Basic strategy
Early game, the deck wants to make land drops and establish a board position by making land drops. I like to tap out to cast card-draw spells over holding up counter mana early game, if it likely allows me to never miss a land drop. The deck can then answer most threats presented by opponents either through the flexible removal suite or countermagic, to preserve life total for later parts of the game. In the mid-game, the deck wants to establish a card parity vs. most of the opponents, usually through Rhystic Study, or one of the Draw X cards-spells. The deck then wants to win in the late game through casting the commander and playing one of the various Vigilance enablers on him, followed by beat down.

The deck rewards, or outright needs, diplomatic play to survive the early turns of some games, against very aggressive opponents. Against all opponents, the deck will have to, and is good at, adapting to the changing board- and game states.

The Deck list:
I’ll leave you with the current deck list, as an image. Click here (TappedOut link) to see the same list but with working card tags etc.

The Greatest Teacher as of 2017-09-09

 


In the following posts, I will break down the deck into categories and discuss some of the card choices as needed. Until then, have a look at my themed custom play mat, drawn by my friend GrimLavamancer.

Advertisements
Previous Post
Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: