The Winter Domain (Ojutai primer, pt. 2)

This is the card-by-card analysis of the string of posts I want to dedicate to this deck, although I will be brief and probably bunch cards together as needed, since some of the cards are essentially the same cards, and some exist in the deck for the exact same reason.

The lands:
I won’t go over the dual lands, since they are quite obvious. The notable omissions from the duals are Port Town, Nimbus Maze, Seachrome Coast, and Irrigated Farmland. There aren’t any notable reasons for any of these omissions, other than the fact that I don’t own these particular lands and haven’t gotten around to get them. None of them are strictly better than the duals I have in the deck anyway.

The basics are numerous in the deck, allowed by the two-colour nature of it. I use the Ojutai basic lands from Dragons of Tarkir in order to tie it all together nicely. They look pretty sweet.

It should be noted that the deck doesn’t outright need the expensive lands like the fetchlands, Tundra, and so on, but those are cards I actually do happen to have, so I’ve included them. The deck can be built much cheaper, and worrying about the manabase in a two-colour deck is overdoing it for most of the time, in my opinion. With that said, let’s have a look at some of the special lands in the deck.

Minamo, School at Water’s Edge – This is perhaps the most important land card in my deck, which is a shame since it’s getting up there in terms of price. It adds pseudo-vigilance to the Commander, which is very important, and it’s also a school, so it ties into the Commander himself flavourfully as well. It’s the land I most often get with Expedition Map.

Calciform Pools – I think that these storage lands are underplayed in the format, and I quite like them in control decks. I want to pass the turn with mana up most of the time anyway and if the lap goes around the table without me spending all of it, I might as well put a counter on this thing, to cast some of the big spells in the deck like the Draw X-cards.

Celestial Colonnade, Mishra’s Factory, Mutavault – I didn’t realize how expensive Celestial Colonnade had gotten, but the other two are at least not outrageously expensive. I think all three merit inclusion in the deck, due to three reasons: 1. They can carry the equipment in the deck in a pinch. 2. They work well as Planeswalker assassins. 3. Most importantly: they protect Ojutai from Edict effects.

The Ramp:
Mana Crypt, Mana Vault, Sol Ring – All of these are awesome, since they produce more mana than they cost. Sol Ring is by far the best of the three, though. Mana Crypt is a bit risky in this kind of deck – since part of the gameplan is to play a long game, the damage really adds up. Thus, I usually don’t play it until the turn I need the extra two mana. Mana Vault allows for a turn 2 commander if I really want to paint a bull’s eye on myself, but is most often used for the large Draw X-spells.

Azorius SignetTalisman of Progress, Thought Vessel, Thran Dynamo – These serve similar purposes, though not the exact kind of purpose. The signet and the talsiman both ramp and fix my mana, both are great. I think the talismans are desperately underplayed in the format, actually, at least all the non-green one should warrant inclusion in any deck they’re allowed in. Thought Vessel is a good rock with a neat upside for the later parts of the game, and Thran Dynamo is my single high-end ramp, used solely to  cast huge spells.

Land Tax, Expedition Map, Wayfarer’s Bauble – Out of these three, only Wayfarer’s Bauble ramps technically, but the other two can be used to fix the mana by getting me whichever basic I need. Expedition Map comes with the obvious upside of getting any land, which includes all of the utility lands I discussed above. Land Tax is great, and combos with Scroll Rack, which is also in the deck.

In total, I run ten mana ramp or fixers, and 38 lands. This is usually more than enough, but it’s always best to stay cautious; I want to be able to make land drops every turn for the first five-six turns easily, and I have the spells to make use of all of my lands at all stages of the game.


In the third and final part of this analysis, I will discuss the cards I cast with the cards I listed above! Until next time!

 

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